Bradman 87 Not OutSir Donald Bradman - The Don

It will long be remembered as the day that marked the end of the finest innings in world cricket history. February 25, 2001 is a date known by cricket followers far and wide as the one that marks the passing of the great Sir Donald George Bradman, a legendary cricketer many have described as the greatest batsman of all time. Many of the amazing batting feats of The Don still remain unsurpassed till this day.

A champion performer both on and off the field, Sir Donald Bradman was known for his sportsmanship and his devotion to the spirit of cricket. Having devoted the best part of his life to the sport, join with us as we pay tribute to this great man and reminisce as the 1st anniversary (25 Feb 2002) of his passing approaches, by taking a look at the life, cricket career and achievements of The Don.

A Tribute to Donald Bradman by Abc of Cricket

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The Man,His Life

Universally regarded as the greatest cricket player of all time and one of Australia's greatest popular heroes.

Over an international career spanning nearly 20 years from 1930 to 1948, Bradman's statistical achievements were unparalleled. He broke scoring records for both first-class and international matches, his highest international score (334 not out) still standing as the highest ever test class score by an Australian (though recently equalled by Mark Taylor, who deliberately cut his score at that point, in what many regard as a tribute to Bradman). 

He so dominated the game that special bowling tactics, known as leg theory or Bodyline, regarded by many as unsporting and dangerous, were devised by England captain Douglas Jardine to reduce his dominance in a series of international matches (Ashes) against England in the Australian summer of 1932-33. The principal English exponent of Bodyline was the Nottinghamshire pace bowler Harold Larwood, and the contest  between Bradman and Larwood was to prove to be the focal point of the contest.

Some indication of his superlative skill was that his average for that series, 56.57, is above the career averages of all but a handful of international players in the 125-odd years of international cricket matches.

Despite occasional battles with illness, he continued to dominate world  cricket throughout the 1930's and is credited with raising the spirit of a  nation (Australia) suffering under the vagaries of the economic depression, until war intervened.

Despite approaching forty, he returned to play cricket after World War II, leading one of the most talented teams in Australia's history. In his farewell 1948 tour of England, the team he led, dubbed "the Invincibles", went undefeated throughout the tour, a feat unmatched until this time.

On the occasion of his last international innings, Bradman needed four runs to be able to retire with a batting average of 100, but was dismissed for nought (in cricketing parlance, "a duck") by spin bowler Eric Hollies. Applauded onto the pitch by both teams, it was sometimes claimed that he was unable to see the ball due to the tears welling in his eyes, a claim Bradman always dismissed as sentimental nonsense. "I knew it would be my last test match after a career spanning 20-years", he said, "but to suggest I got out as some people did, because I had tears in my eyes is to belittle the bowler and is quite untrue." Regardless, he was given a guard of honor by players and spectators alike as he left the ground with a batting average of 99.94 from his 52 tests, nearly double the average of any other player before or since. He was awarded a knighthood in 1949, and a Companion of the Order of Australia (Australia's highest civil honor) in 1979.

After retiring from playing cricket, Bradman continued working as a  stockbroker. Allegations that he had acted improperly during the collapse of his employer's firm and the subsequent establishment of his own, made behind closed doors up until his death, were publicised in November 2001. He became heavily involved in cricket administration, serving as a selector for the national team for nearly 30 years. He was selector (and acknowledged as a force urging the players of both teams to play entertaining, attacking cricket) for the famous Australia - West Indies test series of 1960-61, and was also involved in negotiations with the World Series Cricket schism in the late 1970's. He was also famous for answering innumerable letters from cricket  fans across the world, which he continued to do until well into his eighties.

Bradman married his childhood sweetheart, Jessie, and had one child. An intensely private person, probably because of the intense media scrutiny he suffered under, he was regarded as aloof even by teammates, particularly in later years. A strict Methodist, he has occasionally been accused of anti-Catholicism in his actions as captain and selector, however, it should be pointed out that at that time sectarian prejudice was very widespread in Australia.

Statistical analyses give some credence to the claim that Bradman dominated  his sport more than Pele (soccer ), Ty Cobb (baseball), Tiger Woods (golf) or Michael Jordan (basketball), amongst other champions of their disciplines. Regardless, his impact on a nation's psyche is arguably unmatched.

Career Stats

 Opponents

 Innings

 Not Outs

 Runs

 HS

 Average

 Centuries

 England

 63

 7

 5,028

 334

 89.78

 19

 West Indies

 6

 0

 447

 223

 74.50

 2

 South Africa

 5

 1

 806

 229

 201.50

 4

 India

 6

 2

 715

 201

 178.75

 4

Total

 80

 10

 6,996

 334

 99.94

 29

Bradman Memorabilia

No doubt, after learning a little about this great legendary cricketer, you will either wish to learn more or maybe even purchase some memorabilia associated with Sir Donald Bradman. To make this easy for you, we provide the following links.

 Bradman's Best
Sir Donald Bradman saw more cricket than anyone else in the 20th century. He personally watched virtually all the best cricketers from all the major playing nations, as well as both playing in and selecting Test sides from 1928 to 1971, giving him an unprecedented appreciation of the best the sport had to offer. Towards the end of his life, from a whole century of cricketers, he selected the very finest twelve for his  ideal team. Now, you can read about that team, in the words of the great man himself and in so doing gain an insight into the game he loved.

The Don: The Definitive Biography Of Sir Donald  Bradman
This biography of the cricketer, Donald Bradman, is based on exclusive and extensive interviews with him. It traces the story of his early years and brings to life every major performance.

Bradman Collectables

The Ashes, Bradman and Bodyline

 Match Type

 Innings

 Not Out

 Runs

 HS

 Average

 Centuries

 First Class

 338

 43

 28,067

 452*

 95.14

 117

 Second Class

 331

 64

 22,664

 320*

 84.80

 94

 Test Matches

 80

 10

 6,996

 334

 99.94

 29

 Tests v Eng

 63

 7

 5,028

 334

 89.78

 19

 Sheffield Shield

 96

 15

 8,926

 452*

 110.19

 36

 Grade Cricket

 93

 17

 6,598

 303

 86.80

 28

 All Matches

 669

 107

 50,731

 452*

 90.27

 211

Learn all about the great and legendary Sir Donald Bradman, affectionately known as The Don.

 

 

 

 

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